The Discipline of Sympathy and the Limits of Omniscience in Nineteenth-Century Journalism

Mackenzie, Hazel (2014) The Discipline of Sympathy and the Limits of Omniscience in Nineteenth-Century Journalism. Critical Survey, 26 (2). pp. 53-72. ISSN 0011-1570

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.3167/cs.2014.260203

Abstract

Nineteenth-century literary journalism is often read in the light of Michel Foucault’s disciplinary paradigm as articulated in his seminal work Discipline and Punish: The Birth of a Prison (1975). Contextualising the growth of literary journalism within the evolution of modern, urban society, this article explores the ways in which journalists in this period manipulated generic conventions to both enact and resist their role in creating a more transparent, disciplined society. Looking at the journalism of Charles Lamb, William Hazlitt, Charles Dickens, Charles Collins, John Hollingshead, and William Makepeace Thackeray, this article will argue that their use of a limited, first-person perspective and their emphasis on feeling and sympathy attempts to resist a passive and disciplinary spectatorship and yet paradoxically it is the most significantly disciplinary aspect of their texts.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: P Language and Literature > PB Modern European Languages
P Language and Literature > PR English literature
Divisions: School of Humanities > English Language and Literature > English Literature
Depositing User: Hazel Mackenzie
Date Deposited: 01 Feb 2016 12:41
Last Modified: 12 Oct 2017 15:17
URI: http://bear.buckingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/97

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